http://wjst.wu.ac.th/index.php/wjst/issue/feed Walailak Journal of Science and Technology (WJST) 2020-05-13T09:50:29+07:00 Editor of Walailak J Sci & Tech journal.wu@gmail.com Open Journal Systems <div> <p title="AGRICOLA"><a title="About WJST" href="/index.php/wjst/about" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Walailak Journal of Science and Technology</a> (<strong><em>Walailak J. Sci. &amp; Tech.</em></strong> or <strong>WJST</strong>), is a peer-reviewed journal (<a title="Editorial Board" href="/index.php/wjst/about/editorialTeam" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Editorial Board</a>) covering all areas of science and technology, launched in 2004.<br><br><strong>E-ISSN:</strong> 2228-835X<br><strong>Start year:</strong> 2004<strong><br>Language:</strong> English<br><strong>Publication fee:</strong> <span style="color: #c00000;">Free of Charge</span> <br><strong>Free access:</strong> Immediate<br><strong><strong>Issues per year</strong>:</strong> 12 Issues (<strong><strong><span style="color: #c00000;">Monthly</span></strong></strong>)<br><br><strong>2018 SJR (SCOPUS): <span style="color: #c00000;">0.138 (Q4)&nbsp; </span></strong><strong><strong><img src="/public/site/images/admin/newdata12.gif" alt=""></strong></strong><br><br><strong>Aims and scope </strong><strong><br></strong><a title="Author Guidelines" href="/index.php/wjst/about/submissions#authorGuidelines" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Walailak Journal of Science and Technology</a> is published 12 Issues (<strong>Monthly</strong>) by the Institute of Research and Innovation of Walailak University. The scope of the journal includes the following areas of research: Natural Sciences, Life Sciences, Applied Sciences (<a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1K4nWRs6-CmiSM5d-YI-0fNLCWqRboc-l/view?usp=sharing" target="_blank" rel="noopener">WJST Template 2020</a>).&nbsp;(<a title="Editorial Policies" href="/index.php/wjst/about/editorialPolicies#custom-5" target="_blank" rel="noopener">View full editorial policies</a>)<strong><br></strong></p> <p title="AGRICOLA"><strong>Indexed and Abstracts</strong><br><a title="Author Guidelines" href="/index.php/wjst/about/submissions#authorGuidelines" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Walailak Journal of Science and Technology</a> is indexed in the <a title="TCI" href="http://www.kmutt.ac.th/jif/public_html/index.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Thai-Journal Citation Index Centre (TCI)</a>, <a title="Google Scholar" href="http://scholar.google.com/citations?hl=en&amp;user=9E_wFm4AAAAJ" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Google Scholar</a>, <a title="AGRICOLA" href="http://www.cabdirect.org/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">CAB Abstracts</a>, <a title="EBSCOhost" href="http://www.ebscohost.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">EBSCOhost</a>, <a title="JournalSeek" href="http://journalseek.net/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">JournalSeek</a>, <a title="ASEAN Citation Index (ACI)" href="http://www.asean-cites.org/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ASEAN Citation Index (ACI)</a>,&nbsp; <a title="ROAD: ISSN" href="https://portal.issn.org/resource/ISSN/2228-835X" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ROAD: the Directory of Open Access scholarly Resources</a> and <a title="SCOPUS" href="http://www.scopus.com/home.url" target="_blank" rel="noopener">SCOPUS</a>.</p> <table style="border-collapse: collapse; width: 100%;" border="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width: 12.5%;"><a title="Thai Journal Citation Index" href="http://www.kmutt.ac.th/jif/public_html/index.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/logo_TCI120x.png"></a></td> <td style="width: 12.5%;"><a title="Asean Citation Index" href="http://www.asean-cites.org/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/aci-logo-120x.png"></a></td> <td style="width: 12.5%;"><a title="gs" href="http://scholar.google.com/citations?hl=en&amp;user=9E_wFm4AAAAJ" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/google-scholar-120x.png"></a></td> <td style="width: 12.5%;"><a title="CabAbstract" href="http://www.cabdirect.org/"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/Cab-abstracts-120x.png"></a></td> <td style="width: 12.5%;"><a href="http://www.ebscohost.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"> <img src="/public/site/images/admin/EBSCOlogo120x.png"></a></td> <td style="width: 12.5%;"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/embase120x.jpg"></td> <td style="width: 12.5%;"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/EngineeringVillage120x.png"></td> <td style="width: 12.5%;">&nbsp;</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p title="AGRICOLA">&nbsp;</p> <table style="border-collapse: collapse; width: 100%;" border="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width: 12.5%;"><a title="Scopus" href="http://www.scopus.com/home.url"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/Scopus_120x.png"></a></td> <td style="width: 12.5%;"><a title="ROAD-ISSN" href="https://portal.issn.org/resource/ISSN/2228-835X" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/road-issn-120x.png"></a></td> <td style="width: 12.5%;">&nbsp;</td> <td style="width: 12.5%;">&nbsp;</td> <td style="width: 12.5%;">&nbsp;</td> <td style="width: 12.5%;">&nbsp;</td> <td style="width: 12.5%;">&nbsp;</td> <td style="width: 12.5%;">&nbsp;</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p title="AGRICOLA"><strong>Sponsors and Support</strong><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <table style="border-collapse: collapse; width: 100%;" border="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width: 10%;"><a title="Walailak University" href="http://www.wu.ac.th/en" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/wu-text-120x.jpg"></a></td> <td style="width: 10%;"><a title="Open Journal System" href="https://pkp.sfu.ca/ojs/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/pkp-logo-120x.png" width="105" height="89"></a></td> <td style="width: 10%;"><a title="Thai Science Research and Innovation" href="https://www.trf.or.th/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/tsri-120x.png" width="64" height="96"></a></td> <td style="width: 10%;"><a title="Natiional Research Council of Thailand" href="https://www.nrct.go.th/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/NRCT-Logo-120x.jpg" width="67" height="96"></a></td> <td style="width: 10%;"><a title="datacite" href="http://search.datacite.org/ui" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/DataCite_logo-120x.png" width="110" height="110"></a></td> <td style="width: 10%;"><a title="journalseek" href="http://journalseek.net/"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/JournalSeek-120x.PNG"></a></td> <td style="width: 10%;"><a title="ThaiScience" href="http://www.thaiscience.info/view3.asp?sCode=WJST&amp;sType=JOURNAL" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/thaiscience-120x.png"></a></td> <td style="width: 10%;"><a title="SJR" href="https://www.scimagojr.com/journalsearch.php?q=walailak+Journal+of+Science+and+Technology" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="/public/site/images/admin/sjr-logo-120x.png"></a></td> <td style="width: 10%;">&nbsp;</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p title="AGRICOLA"><br><strong>Editor in Chief</strong><br><a href="https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=w5rFb7YAAAAJ&amp;hl=en">Phongpichit Channuie</a>, School of Science, Walailak University, Thasala, Nakhon Si Thammarat 80161, Thailand</p> </div> <div id="_mcePaste" class="mcePaste" style="position: absolute; left: -10000px; top: 57px; width: 1px; height: 1px; overflow: hidden;"><strong>Free of Charge</strong></div> http://wjst.wu.ac.th/index.php/wjst/article/view/4182 In vitro Shoot Cultures of Tupistra albiflora K. Larsen 2020-05-12T14:50:56+07:00 Jiraporn PALEE jik_jaja@hotmail.com <p>To evaluate an efficient protocol for the micropropagation of <em>Tupistra albiflora</em> K. Larsen, the effects of N6-benzylaminopurine (BA) and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) concentrations on multiple shoot and root induction were examined. <em>In vitro</em> shoots were used as the explant materials which were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) agar medium supplemented with 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 mg/L BA for 4 weeks to induce multiple shoots. It was found that the MS medium containing 3 mg/L BA induced 100 % shoot formation with the highest number of 3.2 shoots per explant (2.4-fold significantly higher than the control). For root induction, <em>in vitro</em> shoots were cultured on MS agar medium supplemented with 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 mg/L NAA for 8 weeks. The results showed that the MS medium containing 1 mg/L NAA induced 100 % root formation with the highest number of 6.6 roots per explant (1.8-fold significantly higher than the control).</p> 2018-09-20T00:00:00+07:00 Copyright (c) 2018 Walailak Journal of Science and Technology (WJST) http://wjst.wu.ac.th/index.php/wjst/article/view/4052 Database System Development for the Care of Elders in the Community 2020-05-08T13:09:44+07:00 Urai JARAEPRAPAL jurai@wu.ac.th Puangrat JINPON jpuangrat@gmail.com <p>This participatory action research aimed to develop a database system for the care of elders in the community, Pak Poon sub-district, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Thailand. The key informants were composed of public health officers, community leaders, representatives of the Local Administrative Organization, elders and their families, and lecturers and nursing students of Walailak University. Research instruments included interview questions, an elderly health assessment form, a developed elderly health database system as an experimental tool, and a usability evaluation form. Data collection was conducted by survey, interview, group discussion, and observation. Quantitative data analysis was conducted by frequency distribution and percentage; the validity and reliability of the questionnaire were confirmed with experts for Cronbach’s alpha. The qualitative data revealed content analysis. The results show that the database system consists of, elder health assessment, comprising general information, prior illness and treatment, functionality, mental health risk, risk for fall, and environment, the required features to support achievement of the goal for well-being, consistent with their life style, social capital, and local wisdom. In addition, the database could be used to reduce early risk factors to protect from chronic illness, injury, and decline in physical and psychosocial function. The reporting requirement comprised frequency distribution in terms of capital, problems, and need. Perception of the system and its effectiveness were evaluated using a questionnaire after participants had had an approximately one month period of experience of using the system. The responses to the questionnaire were positive about the system features and system process. From executives and health officers and elders using the database system, it has been improved, based on feedback continuum.</p> 2018-07-22T00:00:00+07:00 Copyright (c) 2018 Walailak Journal of Science and Technology (WJST) http://wjst.wu.ac.th/index.php/wjst/article/view/5530 The Clinical Supervision Process of Nurse Preceptors in Thailand: A Meta-Ethnography Research 2020-05-08T14:38:27+07:00 Chawapon SARNKHAOWKHOM chawapon.s@yahoo.com Ittipaat SUWATHANPORNKUL ittipaatresearch@gmail.com <p>The purpose of this study was to synthesize five graduate theses on nurse preceptors by using the Meta-Ethnography research method. The research findings fell into three steps, as follows: Step 1- Preparing for teaching. Nurse preceptors prepared for their clinical supervision with four sub-steps,&nbsp; 1) preparing for readiness, 2) studying and reviewing the clinical practice and clinical supervision guidelines of the organization, 3) planning and designing a clinical supervision model, and 4) making clinical supervision plans; Step 2- Teaching. This step consisted of seven sub-steps, 1) creating familiarity with the learners, 2) clinical practice orientation, 3) clarifying the performance evaluation criteria, 4) pre-conference, 5) clinical teaching from real situations, 6) post- conference, and 7) improving clinical teaching skills; Step 3- Teaching evaluation. This step consisted of three sub-steps, as follows. 1) self-evaluation by learners, 2) reflection-evaluation by nurse preceptors, and 3) documentation of evaluation by nurse preceptors. Therefore, nursing administrators can implement the results of this research as a process for clinical supervision and develop supervision systems in the nursing organizations to be more effective.</p> 2018-08-10T00:00:00+07:00 Copyright (c) 2018 Walailak Journal of Science and Technology (WJST) http://wjst.wu.ac.th/index.php/wjst/article/view/4315 Quality of Work Life among Public Health Nurses: A Survey Comparison between Thailand and Japan 2020-05-08T15:29:15+07:00 Patcharee KOMJAKRAPHAN patcharee.ko@psu.ac.th Kurumi TSURUTA patcharee.ko@psu.ac.th Tamayo HASAGAWA patcharee.ko@psu.ac.th Toshihiko YANAGITA patcharee.ko@psu.ac.th Amy HOMBU patcharee.ko@psu.ac.th Piyanuch JITANOON patcharee.ko@psu.ac.th Karnsunaphat BALTHIP patcharee.ko@psu.ac.th <p>Researchers from Thailand and Japan have initiated a collaborative project to compare the Quality of Work Life (QWL) among public health nurses. Thus, the QWL of registered nurses working in a community in Thailand was identified and compared with the Public Health Nurses (PHNs) in Japan. The purpose of which was to determine the similarities and differences between the two countries regarding their nurses’ quality of work life. The 42-item of Brooks’ survey of Quality of Nursing Work Life (QNWL) was translated and evaluated in Thailand and Japan. There were 102 Thai and 209 Japanese public health nurses completed the questionnaire.</p> <p>Findings showed that the QNWL level of both Thai and Japanese PHNs were at moderate level. Thai nurses scored higher than Japanese nurses in overall scores. Thai reported significantly higher on work design dimensions (t = 9.12, p &lt; 0.05). For both groups, three out of four dimensions were ranked in the same pattern in which home life/work life was recorded as the lowest. This was followed by work design and work context. However, Thai scored lowest on work world dimension, while Japanese scored highest on that dimension. Findings also showed significant association between country and age groups (χ2 = 20.01, p = 0.00, marital status (χ2 = 6.50, p = 0.01), education (χ2 = 70.05, p = 0.00), and dependent family members (χ2 = 128.16, p = 0.00). No significant association was noted between country and gender (χ2 = 0.37, p = 0.54), and between country and work experience (χ2 = 2.88, p = 0.23).The findings extended our understanding of the Public Health Nurse’s quality of work life that contributes to nursing in different cultural contexts through a rare direct comparison of Public Health Nurses between Thailand and Japan.</p> 2018-07-16T00:00:00+07:00 Copyright (c) 2018 Walailak Journal of Science and Technology (WJST) http://wjst.wu.ac.th/index.php/wjst/article/view/5036 Factors Associated with Psychological Well-being among Parents of a Critically Ill Child in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit 2020-05-08T16:37:05+07:00 Jiraporn PUNYOO jiraporn.pun@mahidol.ac.th Linchong POTHIBAN linchong.p@cmu.ac.th Usanee JINTRAWET ujjusanee@gmail.com Jutarat MESUKKO jmesukko@yahoo.com Sanit REUNGRONGRAT sreungro@med.cmy.ac.th <p>A child’s hospitalization in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is a stressful and suffering situation affecting the parents. This correlational study aims to investigate the predicting factors of parents’ psychological well-being with regard to a critically ill child in the PICU. The participants were 100 parents with a child hospitalized in one of the five PICUs of five tertiary hospitals. The research instruments included the Demographic Recording Form, the Child’s Behavioral and Emotional Responses Scale, the Sense of Coherence Scale-Short Form (SOC-13), Thai Version, the Jalowiec Coping Scale (JCS), the Buddhist Belief Questionnaire, the Modified Version of Social Support Questionnaire, Thai Version, and the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient, and hierarchical multiple regression. The results of hierarchical multiple regression showed that religious belief, the child's behavioral and emotional responses, sense of coherence, coping, and social support could explain 36 % of the variance in the psychological well-being of parents of a critically ill child. The factors that made significant contributions to the model were religious belief (β = 0.29, p &lt; 0.01), sense of coherence (β = 0.27, p &lt; 0.01), the child’s behavioral and emotional responses (β = -0.24, p &lt; 0.01), social support (β = 0.22, p &lt; 0.05), and coping (β = 0.17, p &lt; 0.05). The results of this study may serve as preliminary information for nurses in planning nursing interventions in order to enhance the psychological well-being of the parents.</p> 2018-07-18T00:00:00+07:00 Copyright (c) 2018 Walailak Journal of Science and Technology (WJST) http://wjst.wu.ac.th/index.php/wjst/article/view/4885 A Phenomenological Study: Family Experience in Expressed Emotion in Providing Care for Client with Risk of Aggressive Behavior 2020-05-12T15:35:40+07:00 Ika Ratih WIBAWA ikaratihwibawa@yahoo.com Achir Yani S. HAMID ayanihamid@yahoo.co.id Novy Helena C. DAULIMA novy.pangemanan0@lycos.com <p>Agressive and violent behaviors are among the symptoms manifested in individual with schizophrenia. The relationship between caregiving and mental disorder can be assessed through expressed emotion (EE). This study aimed to identify family experience in expressing emotion when providing care for client with risk of aggressive behavior. The design of the study was qualitative and it employed a phenomenological approach. Six participants were involved in an in-depth interview about their experiences in expressing emotion in providing care for client with risk of aggressive behavior. The findings identified three themes. These are; psychological responses followed by physical responses as manifestated by family response, hostility as reflection of family’s negative emotion, and positive interaction within family to meet psychological need. The findings may be used as a reference for nurses and families to consider EE when providing care for client with risk of aggressive behavior. The result emphasized that psychiatric nurses should consider EE when providing psychosocial interventions as this predicts the course of illness.</p> 2018-10-10T00:00:00+07:00 Copyright (c) 2018 Walailak Journal of Science and Technology (WJST) http://wjst.wu.ac.th/index.php/wjst/article/view/4819 Effects of the Nursing Therapeutics Program for Facilitating Patient Transition (NTPFPT) on Subjective Well-Being, Role Mastery, and Relationships’ Well-Being among Adult Stroke Patients in Bandung, Indonesia 2020-05-12T15:54:27+07:00 Cecep Eli KOSASIH ek_cecep@yahoo.co.id Busakorn PUNTHMATHARITH p.busakorn@gmail.com Umaporn BOONYASOPUN umaporn.b@psu.ac.th <p>This quasi-experimental, repeated measures design was used to examine the effects of the nursing therapeutics program for facilitating patient transition (NTPFPT) on subjective well-being, role mastery, and relationships’ well-being among adult patients who suffered from stroke in Indonesia. Purposive sampling was used to recruit the sample. The control group (n = 42) received the routine care, while the experimental group (n = 42) received the NTPFPT and routine care. The data were collected using 1) the subjective well-being inventory, 2) the role function mode, and 3) the brief family relationship scale. The Chronbach’s alpha coefficients of questionnaires 1 - 3 were .89, .77 and .89, respectively. Descriptive statistics, repeated measures ANOVA, one-way ANOWA, and t-test were used to analyze the data.</p> <p>The results revealed that significant differences of the mean scores of subjective well-being, role mastery and relationships’ well-being were found between the control and experimental groups (<em>p</em> &lt; .000) and between three times (e.g., Day 3 of hospitalization, T1; one day before discharge, T2; and one month after discharge, T3) within group (<em>p</em> &lt; .000). Significant differences between all three pair wise comparisons of these three variables were found in the experimental group (<em>p</em> &lt; .000) while, two pair wise comparisons showed significant differences in the control group. The mean scores of the three variables in the experimental group measured at T2 and T3 were significantly higher than those of the control group (<em>p</em> &lt; .000) whereas those of measured at T1 showed no significant differences between two groups (<em>p</em> &gt; .05). Thus, it is appropriate for nurses to provide the NTPFPT to stroke patients and families.</p> <p>The results revealed that significant differences of the mean scores of subjective well-being, role mastery and well-being of relationships were found between the control and experimental groups (<em>p</em> &lt; .000) and between three times (e.g., Day 3 of hospitalization, T1; one day before discharge, T2; and one month after discharge, T3)within group (p &lt; .000).Significant differences between all three pair wise comparisons of these three variables were found in the experimental group (<em>p</em> &lt; .000) whereas in the control group, only two pair wise comparisons were significant differences. The mean scores of the three variables in the experimental group measured at T2 and T3 were significantly higher than those of the control group (<em>p</em> &lt; .000) whereas those of measured at T1 were non significant differences between two groups (<em>p</em> &gt; .05). Thus, it is appropriate for nurses to provide the NTPFPT to stroke patients and families.</p> 2018-10-18T00:00:00+07:00 Copyright (c) 2018 Walailak Journal of Science and Technology (WJST) http://wjst.wu.ac.th/index.php/wjst/article/view/4686 A Causal Model of Caregiving Burden among Dementia Caregivers 2020-05-12T16:09:03+07:00 Chalinee SUVANAYOS chalinee92@gmail.com Darawan THAPINTA darawan1955@gmail.com Wichit SRISUPHAN darawan1955@gmail.com Hunsa SETHABOUPPHA darawan1955@gmail.com Sirirat PANUTHAI darawan1955@gmail.com <p>In this study, a cross-sectional, predictive correlation design was used to identify and test a causal relationship between behavior disturbances, coping, family conflict, self-esteem and social support to caregiver burden among dementia caregivers. A total of 450 caregivers of dementia aged over 18 years were recruited from 4 hospitals in northern Thailand based on selected criteria. Demographic Questionnaire, Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer’s Disease Rating Scale (BEHAVE-AD, The Family Conflict Scale, The Zarit Burden Interview Scale, The Perceived Social Support Questionnaire, The Brief COPE and The Rosenberg Self-Esteem with acceptable reliability coefficients were used to collect data.&nbsp; Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s Product-Moment Correlation and path analysis by structural equation modeling.</p> <p>Results showed that the modified model fitted with the data and explained 58 % of the variance in caregiving burden among dementia caregivers. Coping and family conflict had a positive direct effect on caregiving burden (p &lt; 0.001), whereas self-esteem and social support had a direct negative effect on caregiving burden (p &lt; 0.001). Behavior disturbance had a positive indirect effect caregiving burden (p &lt; 0.001) via family conflict. Coping had a positive indirect effect on caregiving burden (p &lt; 0.001) via behavior disturbance and family conflict. Social support had a negative indirect effect on caregiving burden (p &lt; 0.001) via family conflict and self-esteem. The results of this study could be used as a guideline for psychiatric nurses in planning an appropriate intervention program to reduce burden of caregivers of dementia patients in Thailand.</p> 2018-08-26T00:00:00+07:00 Copyright (c) 2018 Walailak Journal of Science and Technology (WJST) http://wjst.wu.ac.th/index.php/wjst/article/view/5518 RNA Sequence Analysis of Growth-Related Genes in Penaeus monodon 2020-05-13T09:50:29+07:00 Nifareesa CHEALOH nifareesa@gmail.com Sataporn DIREKBUSARAKOM dsatapor@wu.ac.th Piyapong CHOTIPUNTU cpiyapon@wu.ac.th Pitchanee JARIYAPONG jpitcha@wu.ac.th Hidehiro KONDO h-kondo@kaiyodai.ac.jp Ikuo HIRONO hirono@kaiyodai.ac.jp Suwit WUTHISUTHIMETHAVEE suwitwuth@gmail.com <p><em>Penaeus monodon</em> is one of the most economically important shrimp species in Thailand. However, little information is available about the functional genomics related to its growth performance. In this study, Illumina paired-end sequencing was used to analyze transcriptomes related to growth performance in <em>P. monodon</em> muscle. A total of 38.4 million reads were generated. The pooled reads, from 10 libraries, were <em>de novo</em> assembled into 113,991 genes, with an average length of 337 bp. Gene expression was analyzed with the edgeR program, which revealed 705 differentially expressed contigs (<em>p</em> &lt; 0.05) in fast-growth shrimp compared to slow-growth shrimp. The results show the 234 up-regulated contigs in fast-growth shrimp are mostly underlined genes involving the metabolic pathway. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed seven genes involved in the cell cycle that were expressed more in fast-growth shrimp (<em>p</em> &lt; 0.05) than in slow-growth shrimp, and moderately to strongly correlated with shrimp body weight. These genes may be good candidates for growth performance improvement in <em>P. monodon.</em></p> 2018-06-25T00:00:00+07:00 Copyright (c) 2018 Walailak Journal of Science and Technology (WJST) http://wjst.wu.ac.th/index.php/wjst/article/view/5583 Prospect of Plant-based Flavonoids to Overcome Antibacterial Resistance: A Mini-Review 2020-05-13T08:15:52+07:00 Abdi Wira SEPTAMA abdiwiraseptama@gmail.com Nordin SIMBAK abdi.september@gmail.com Eldiza Puji RAHMI abdi.september@gmail.com <p>Although antibiotic has been frequently used for the treatment of infection, it has led to the emergence of resistant problem. Plant-derived compounds are alternative source for discovering novel therapeutics. Flavonoid is widely distributed and present in plant kingdom. This compound possessed several pharmacological properties including antibacterial. This review aims to present some information about the potency of flavonoids as antibacterial compound including their mechanism of antibacterial action as well as the relationship between their activity and flavonoid structure. The synergistic effect of flavonoids when used in combination with antibiotics against resistant bacterial is also described. Published literatures were collected from data bases such as PubMed, Google Scholar, Science Direct and Scopus. Scientific papers were selected based on information of antibacterial activity of flavonoid compounds. The information may provide an insight on the potency of flavonoid compounds to overcome resistant problem.</p> 2019-05-03T00:00:00+07:00 Copyright (c) 2019 Walailak Journal of Science and Technology (WJST)