Dehydrostephanine Isolated from Stephania venosa Possesses Anti-Inflammatory Activity in Lipopolysaccharide-Activated RAW264.7 Macrophages

  • Wanatsanan CHULRIK School of Allied Health Sciences and Research Institute for Health Sciences, Walailak University, Nakhon Si Thammarat 80161, Thailand
  • Chutima JANSAKUN School of Allied Health Sciences and Research Institute for Health Sciences, Walailak University, Nakhon Si Thammarat 80161, Thailand
  • Waraluck CHAICHOMPOO Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ramkhamhaeng University, Bangkok 10240, Thailand
  • Janejira HATA Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ramkhamhaeng University, Bangkok 10240, Thailand
  • Poonsit HIRANSAI School of Allied Health Sciences and Research Institute for Health Sciences, Walailak University, Nakhon Si Thammarat 80161, Thailand
  • Wilanee CHUNGLOK Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla 90110, Thailand
  • Tanyarath UTAIPAN Department of Pre-clinic, Faculty of Science and Technology, Prince of Songkla University, Pattani Campus, Pattani 94001, Thailand
  • Apichart SUKSAMRARN Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ramkhamhaeng University, Bangkok 10240, Thailand
  • Warangkana CHUNGLOK School of Allied Health Sciences and Research Institute for Health Sciences, Walailak University, Nakhon Si Thammarat 80161, Thailand
Keywords: Stephania venosa, (–)-Stephanine, Dehydrostephanine, Aporphine alkaloids, Inflammation

Abstract

Stephania venosa (Blume) Spreng. is a medicinal herb wildly used as a folklore medicine in Thailand. Many studies have reported that S. venosa tuber revealed a variety of pharmacological activities including anti-malarial, anti-microbial, anti-cancer, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the effects of (–)-stephanine and dehydrostephanine isolated from S. venosa tuber on anti-inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 macrophages. RAW264.7 cells were treated with (–)-stephanine and dehydrostephanine in the presence of LPS and cell viability was determined by MTT assay. The levels of inflammatory mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined by Griess reagent and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Pre-treatment of dehydrostephanine significantly suppressed NO secretion in LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells with the half-maximal NO inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 26.81±0.25 μM. However, (–)-stephanine had IC50 value on the inhibition of NO secretion of >40 μM. In addition, dehydrostephanine at concentrations of 20 - 80 μM significantly reduced LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1b, and interleukin-6 production in RAW264.7 cells. The present study showed that dehydrostephanine possesses the anti-inflammatory effect on LPS-activated RAW264.7 macrophages by suppression of inflammatory mediators. Dehydrostephanine may be a promising candidate compound for further investigation of a novel class of anti-inflammatory drug.

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Published
2020-07-01
How to Cite
CHULRIK, W., JANSAKUN, C., CHAICHOMPOO, W., HATA, J., HIRANSAI, P., CHUNGLOK, W., UTAIPAN, T., SUKSAMRARN, A., & CHUNGLOK, W. (2020). Dehydrostephanine Isolated from Stephania venosa Possesses Anti-Inflammatory Activity in Lipopolysaccharide-Activated RAW264.7 Macrophages. Walailak Journal of Science and Technology (WJST), 17(7), 655-664. Retrieved from http://wjst.wu.ac.th/index.php/wjst/article/view/6530